Cosmic ray models for early galactic lithium, beryllium, and boron production

Cover of: Cosmic ray models for early galactic lithium, beryllium, and boron production |

Published by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in Batavia, IL, [Washington, DC, Springfield, Va .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Abundance.,
  • Astronomical models.,
  • Background radiation.,
  • Beryllium.,
  • Boron.,
  • Computational astrophysics.,
  • Cosmic rays.,
  • Gamma rays.,
  • Lithium.,
  • Spectrum analysis.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementBrian D. Fields, Kieth A. Olive, and David N. Schramm.
SeriesFermilab pub -- 94/010-A., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-197626.
ContributionsOlive, Keith A., Schramm, David N., Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15409784M

Download Cosmic ray models for early galactic lithium, beryllium, and boron production

TY - JOUR. T1 - Cosmic-ray models for early Galactic lithium, beryllium, and boron production. AU - Fields, Brian D. AU - Olive, Keith A. AU - Schramm, David by:   Cosmic Ray Models for Early Galactic Lithium, Beryllium, and Boron Production Brian Fields, Keith Olive, David Schramm (Submitted on 11 May )Author: Brian Fields, Keith Olive, David Schramm.

To better understand the early galactic production of Li, Be, and B by cosmic ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic ray models and model parameters is examined.

The sensitivity of elemental and isotropic production to the cosmic ray pathlength magnitude and energy dependence, source spectrum spallation kinematics, and cross section Cited by: 1.

COSMIC RAY MODELS FOR EARLY GALACTIC LITHIUM, BERYLLIUM, AND BORON PRODUCTION Brian D. Fields,1 Keith A. Olive,2 and David N. Schramm1,3 1 The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2 School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 3 NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator.

To understand better the early galactic production of Li, Be, and B by cosmic ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic ray models and boron production book model parameters is examined. The sensitivity of elemental and isotopic production to the cosmic ray pathlength magnitude and energy dependence, source spectrum, spallation kinematics, and cross Cited by: BibTeX @MISC{Fields94cosmicray, author = {Brian D.

Fields and Keith A. Olive and David N. Schramm}, title = {COSMIC RAY MODELS FOR EARLY GALACTIC LITHIUM, BERYLLIUM, AND BORON PRODUCTION}, year = {}}. Cosmic ray models for early galactic lithium, beryllium, and boron production.

To better understand the early galactic production of Li, Be, and B by cosmic ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic ray models and model parameters is examined. The sensitivity of elemental and isotropic. Cosmic ray models for early galactic lithium, beryllium, and boron production.

By B Fields, Keith A Olive and D Schramm. Abstract. To understand better the early galactic production of Li, Be, and B by cosmic ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic ray models and model parameters is examined.

The. Models for Galactic Cosmic-Ray Propagation taken into account using the force-field approximation. The isotopic cross sections for B/C were calculated using the authors’ fits to major beryllium and boron production cross sections C,N,O + Be,B.

Other cross sections are calculated using the Webber et al. ()3 and/or Silberberg and. The origin and evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron is a crossing point be-tween di erent astrophysical elds: optical and gamma spectroscopy, non ther-mal nucleosynthesis, Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis and nally galactic evolution.

We describe the production and the evolution of Lithium-Beryllium. COSMIC RAY PRODUCTION OF BERYLLIUM AND BORON AT HIGH REDSHIFT Emmanuel Rollinde,1 David Maurin,1,2 Elisabeth Vangioni,1 Keith A.

Olive,3 and Susumu Inoue4 Received July 23; accepted October 26 ABSTRACT Recently, new observations of 6Li in Population II stars of the Galactic halo have shown a surprisingly high abun- dance of this isotope, about a thousand.

Abstract. Discovery of beryllium and boron in metal-deficient stars of the Galactic halo population raises raises serious problems about production of these elements by cosmic-ray spallation on interstellar CNO nuclei. The cosmic-ray isotopes of lithium, beryllium, and boron (LiBeB) are generally believed to originate from interactions within the interstellar medium, primarily through CNO spallation.

Other sources are known to contribute to the abundance of ^7Li and ^(11)B, most notably the production of beryllium from big bang nucleosynthesis. Thus, identifying the abundances of the galactic cosmic-ray LiBeB. We review progress in high-energy cosmic ray physics focusing on recent experimental results and models developed for their interpretation.

Emphasis is put on the propagation of charged cosmic rays, covering the whole range from ∼ (20–50) GV, i.e. the rigidity when solar modulations can be neglected, up to the highest energies observed. We discuss models aiming to explain the. We reassess the problem of the production of the light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron, by energetic collisions between Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and interstellar gas nuclei, in the.

AMS published the precision measurement of the lithium, beryllium, and boron fluxes in cosmic rays in the rigidity range from GV to TV. This measurement is based on million lithium, million beryllium, and million boron nuclei collected by AMS during the first 5 years of operation aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

OG Probing Cosmic Ray Origin With Beryllium and Boron B.D. Fields 1 and K.A. Olive 2 1 Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, Urbana IL, USA 2 School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN USA Abstract The propagation of cosmic rays through the interstellar medium (ISM) inevitably produces LiBeB nuclei.

The American Astronomical Society (AAS), established in and based in Washington, DC, is the major organization of professional astronomers in North America.

Its membership of. Yet lithium, beryllium, and boron not only all exist, they're essential to life processes here on Earth. This is a straightforward model of a single plant cell, with many of the familiar.

Cosmic Rays is a two-part book that first elucidates the discovery, nature, and particles produced by cosmic rays. This part also looks into the primary cosmic radiation; radio waves from the galaxy; extensive air showers; origin of cosmic rays; and other cosmic radiations. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have long been known to be a significant source of lithium, beryllium, and boron nucleosynthesis (Reeves, Fowler, & Hoyle ; Meneguzzi, Audouze, & Reeves ).

These elements are produced via spallation and fusion reactions between cosmic ray nuclei and those in the interstellar medium (ISM). David N. Schramm's research works w citations and 1, reads, including: Eighteenth Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology: “Texas in Chicago”.

Relying on the observational evidence about Li, Be and B Galactic evolution as well as about the distribution of massive stars, we show that most of the EPs responsible for the production of light elements must be accelerated inside superbubbles, as is probably the case for the standard Galactic cosmic rays as well.

Lithium, Beryllium and Boron are mostly to be produced purely from collision of cosmic rays, such as Carbon and Oxygen, with the interstellar medium (ISM). Secondary Cosmic Rays 2 Cosmic rays are commonly modeled as a relativistic gas diffusing into a magnetized plasma.

Cosmic rays are high-energy protons and atomic nuclei which move through space at nearly the speed of originate from the sun, from outside of the solar system, and from distant galaxies. They were discovered by Victor Hess in in balloon experiments. Direct measurement of cosmic rays, especially at lower energies, has become possible since the launch of the first satellites in.

Since Li is also produced by Galactic cosmic ray nucleosynthesis, we argue that 6Li can be depleted in halo stars with metallicities between [Fe/H]=−2and−1.

Keywords. Nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances, early universe 1. Introduction The origin and evolution of lithium, beryllium and boron (LiBeB), is correlated to several.

InEric Lerner, now LPPF Chief Scientist, published results showing that cosmic rays from stars formed when the galaxy was young could have produced the observed amounts of not only boron and beryllium, but lithium as well. Lithium was hypothesized to have been created in small amounts in the Big Bang.

The light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron hold the key. Since these elements are formed when carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen strike interstellar protons, we can calculate how long, on average, cosmic rays must travel through space in order to experience enough collisions to account for the amount of lithium and the other light elements that.

With: Azzarello, Philipp / Bourquin, Maurice / Cadoux, Franck / Leluc, Catherine / Li, Yang / Paniccia, Mercedes / Pohl, Martin / Rapin, Divic Jean / Wu, Xin / Perrina, Chiara Published in Physical Review Letters.

vol.no. 2, p. Abstract We report on the observation of new properties of secondary cosmic rays Li, Be, and B measured in the rigidity (momentum per unit charge.

Abstract. The isotopes of lithium, beryllium, and boron (LiBeB) are known in nature to be produced primarily by CNO spallation and a - a fusion from interactions between cosmic rays and interstellar nuclei.

While the dominant source of LiBeB isotopes in the present epoch is cosmic-ray interactions, other sources are known to. synthesized in stars, are primaries.

Nuclei such as lithium, beryllium, and boron (which are not abundant end-products of stellar nucleosynthesis) are secondaries. partially excludes the lower energy galactic cosmic rays from the inner solar system.

The heavy black line is a model of pure secondary production [28] and the three thin. Abstract. We consider the production of 6 Li in spallation reactions by cosmic rays in order to explain the observed abundance in halo metal-poor stars.

We show that heating of ambient gas by cosmic rays is an inevitable consequence of this process, and estimate the energy input required to reproduce the observed abundance of 6 Li/H ∼ 10 −11 to be of the order of a few hundred eV per particle. Spallation reactions are crucial for the production of other light elements 1, such as beryllium and boron, so observations of lithium isotopic abundances can be used to test model predictions 2,3.

A complete study of ionization induced by cosmic rays, both solar and galactic, in the atmosphere, is presented. For the computation of the cosmic ray induced ionization, the CRII model was used [1] as well its new version [2] which is extended to the upper atmosphere.

In this work, this model has been applied to the entire atmosphere, i.e. from. Since lithium, beryllium, and boron are small atoms, they are more likely to be formed in cosmic ray collisions. Lithium provides an interesting special case. Of the two stable isotopes of lithium, 7 Li is more abundant.

We know from the Big Bang theory that some of it was created shortly after the Big Bang. The amount produced is small. Secondary cosmic rays consist of the other nuclei which are not abundant nuclear synthesis end products, or products of the Big Bang, primarily lithium, beryllium, and boron.

These light nuclei appear in cosmic rays in much greater abundance (about particles) than in solar atmospheres, where their abundance is about 10 −7 that of helium. Beryllium is a chemical element with the symbol Be and atomic number 4. It is a relatively rare element in the universe, usually occurring as a product of the spallation of larger atomic nuclei that have collided with cosmic the cores of stars, beryllium is depleted as it is fused into heavier elements.

It is a divalent element which occurs naturally only in combination with other. Get this from a library. LiBeB, cosmic rays, and related X- and gamma-rays: proceedings of a conference held at Institut d'astrophysique de Paris, France, 9.

The remaining fraction is made up of the other heavier nuclei that are typical nucleosynthesis end products, primarily lithium, beryllium, and boron.

These nuclei appear in cosmic rays in much greater abundance (~1%) than in the solar atmosphere, where they are. Despite being the 3rd, 4th, and 5th lightest elements of all, the abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron are far below all the other nearby elements in the periodic table.

Lithium, beryllium and boron despite being very light elements are relatively rare in the universe, because they are not directly created by fusion within stars, instead they are created by the.2 Cosmic rays where E is the energy-per-nucleon (including rest mass energy), and α (≡ γ +1)= is the differential spectral index of the cosmic ray flux and γ is the integral spectral index.

About 79% of the primary nucleons are free protons and about 70% of the rest are. Cosmic-Ray Lithium Production at a Type Ia Supernova Following a Nova Eruption (arXiv) Galactic Lithium sources: novae 7Be absorption lines in the early phase spectra of •No hard component in Beryllium or Boron spectra.

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